as adopted by the BoT on November 17, 2018

Recognizing our calling to be stewards of creation, we at Silliman University are committed to the prevention of environmental pollution, the conservation and enhancement of our natural resources, and sustainability.

In keeping with our perspective of total human development for the well-being of society and environment, Silliman University’s environmental commitment suffuses all aspects of the Sillimanian experience (classroom, Church, culture, athletic court, and community). Students entering Silliman should leave the university with a deeper commitment to sustainability and with the competence to protect our environment wherever their lives may take them.

Silliman University as an institution shows the way by being a model of a sustainable campus, demonstrating the principles of Zero Waste, the waste management hierarchy, energy conservation and renewable energy utilization, biodiversity conservation, and a reduced carbon footprint. Silliman University’s commitment is reflected in our internal management processes (administration, operations, planning, and infrastructure development). Silliman University strives to meet and, where practicable, exceed our environmental obligations under the law. We believe that everyone is a stakeholder and has a role to play in sustainability, thus our environmental commitment engages the whole Silliman community, the city we live in, and beyond.

Silliman University’s commitment to the environment encompasses nine component activities:

  1. Teaching: Environmental sustainability and stewardship integrated into the curriculum and the educational experience of all students, and in knowledge sharing among staff and faculty
  2. Research: Research on environmental issues and solutions within and among multiple disciplines, and knowledge transfer
  3. Service: Environmental restoration and preservation incorporated in service learning, volunteerism, and other efforts in the service of the community
  4. Worship and Fellowship: Reflection, discernment, and recommitment to the Christian vocation of responsible stewardship of God’s creation
  5. Culture and Sports: Changes in lifestyle towards a small ecological footprint promoted through sports, arts and the humanities, and forms of cultural expression
  6. Outreach: Information sharing, collaboration, and partnerships on environmental protection with other educational institutions, civil society organizations, government, businesses, international organizations, and the community as a whole
  7. Planning and Development: Waste minimization, green building design and construction, renewable energy use and low utility consumption, material resource efficiency, water conservation, reduced environmental impact, eco-friendly mobility and transportation options, enhanced biodiversity, and preservation of green spaces, considered in planning and budgeting
  8. Administration: Monitoring and periodic evaluation of performance indicators, and continuous improvement of the university’s environmental performance
  9. Operations: Internal practices aligned with the principles of environmental sustainability.

Definitions

Biodiversity conservation: Preserving the biological diversity of ecosystems and species in their natural habitats through such activities as caring for protected areas, avoiding unsustainable use of natural resources, preventing pollutant releases to the environment, and promoting landscaping, agricultural, fishery and forestry practices that enhance biodiversity or at least minimize adverse impacts

Carbon footprint: The total amount of carbon dioxide and other carbon compounds emitted by an individual, event, product, or organization (such as a university) due to the direct or indirect burning of fossil fuel; the size of the carbon footprint reflects the contribution to global warming

Ecological footprint: The biological productive area needed to provide for everything a person or institution uses; the ecological footprint measures human demand on nature; a large footprint reflects the lack of sustainability of a person’s lifestyle or of the institution

Energy conservation: Minimizing the consumption of energy by reducing wastage and loss, demand side management, utilizing energy-efficient products, and improving operations and maintenance

Material resource efficiency: Doing more with less, using the Earth’s limited resources in a sustainable way, managing them more efficiently throughout their life cycle, while minimizing their impacts on the environment

Renewable energy utilization: Using energy from renewable resources which are naturally replenished on a human timescale, such as solar, wind, wave, tidal, and biogas energy

Sustainability: Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (Brundtland Commission of the United Nations, 1987)

Waste management hierarchy: The order of priorities or preferences for managing waste, wherein waste prevention (source reduction) has the highest priority; followed by reuse; then recycling and composting; then recovery when done in a manner that protects the environment and does not undermine Zero Waste goals; and lastly, safe disposal as the lowest priority

Zero Waste: An ethical, economical, efficient and visionary goal to guide people in changing their lifestyles and practices to emulate sustainable natural cycles where all discarded materials are designed to become resources for others to use; Zero Waste entails designing and managing products and processes to systematically avoid and eliminate the volume and toxicity of waste and materials, conserve and recover all resources, and not burn or bury them (Zero Waste International Alliance, 2009); Zero Waste employs management and planning approaches that emphasize waste prevention as opposed to end-of-pipe waste management (Zero Waste New Zealand Trust, 2001)

SILLIMAN UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL Policies

Note: These policies apply university-wide to faculty, staff and students as well as to concessionaires, booth operators, event organizers, sponsors, and visitors. Department chairs and unit heads shall be the main persons responsible for ensuring compliance with these policies in their respective departments or units.

  1. General Policies on Waste Prevention and Waste Management
    • Everyone shall practice pollution prevention (also known as waste reduction or source reduction) by:
      • Using reusable or biodegradable bags, reusable straws, reusable drinking bottles, and reusable or biodegradable containers when purchasing products, food items, and drinks;
        • Eliminate the use of single-use plastic bags and Styrofoam containers on campus, in keeping with City Ordinance 231;
        • Refrain from bringing single-use plastic cutlery, plastic straws and stirrers, plastic bags, and other single-use non-recyclable or non-biodegradable containers into the university;
        • Avoid products or food in non-recyclable or non-biodegradable packaging, such as sachets and plastic wrappers.
        • Avoid water and drinks in plastic bottles whenever water dispensers, drink dispensers, and water fountains are available.
      • Littering, dumping of waste in canals or esteros, and open burning are prohibited.
      • Everyone is required to know the types of waste that belong in each marked bin. Everyone shall practice strict segregation at source by placing their wastes in the respective bins according to four basic classifications: biodegradable, recyclable, residual, and special (hazardous) waste.
      • Everyone shall maximize the reuse and recycling of materials to the greatest extent possible.
      • Everyone shall cooperate and support Buildings & Grounds, Cafeteria, Housing and Residences, and other units of the university in implementing waste prevention and management policies.
  1. Green Procurement Policies
    • To encourage sustainable use of resources and reduce impacts on the environment and health, all administrative and academic units shall purchase recycled and environmentally preferable products and services whenever practicable.
    • The University shall require contractors and consultants to use recycled and environmentally preferable products whenever possible.
    • When assessing and comparing products and services, the following guidelines shall apply:
      • Products and services that promote pollution prevention, waste reduction, and diversion – products that are easier to recycle and repair, products that facilitate disassembly for refurbishment and recycling, products that are packed in recycled or recyclable material, products that avoid waste during manufacturing, products that are used or remanufactured, products that have greater durability and longer life-span, products and services that minimize adverse environmental impacts
      • Products and services that conserve resources – products with high recycled content, designs that require less material to manufacture, products that use less packaging, services that use recycled materials and less packaging, products and services that maximize water efficiency
      • Products and services that conserve energy – products and services where consumption of fossil fuel during production, transport, usage and delivery is minimized; products and services where more renewable energy is used in production, transport, usage and delivery; products and services that facilitate energy efficiency and resource conservation
      • Products and services that protect human health and well-being – products with contents, ingredients, resulting wastes, or waste byproducts that are not persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substances (PBTs); have low greenhouse gas emissions; cause minimal or no habitat destruction and soil degradation; and maximize safety
    • Importation of non-environmentally acceptable consumer products or packaging in non-environmentally acceptable materials is prohibited, in keeping with RA 9003.
    • Green procurement policies apply to products and services that include, but are not limited to, paper and paper products, office supplies, computer and other electronic supplies, office furniture, vehicles, food and catering, promotional materials, banners, posters, and publications.
  1. Policies Related to Food and Food Waste

These policies apply to food sold on campus, food purchased outside campus and brought into the campus, as well as to food delivered into the campus.

  • Wrapping or serving food in compostable materials such as banana leaves, or in reusable glass, ceramic, metal or hard plastic containers is preferred. Plastic bags and single-use plastic containers are prohibited except on rare occasions where they are proven essential for food safety.
  • Reusable mugs or cups for hot drinks, glass for water or beverage, and paper cups should be used. Styrofoam cups and single-use plastic cups are prohibited.
  • Coffee should be served in pots instead of providing powdered coffee in sachets. Ketchup and other condiments should be served in bottles, bowls, or dispensers instead of in sachets. Food items in sachets are prohibited.
  • Plastic straws are prohibited; reusable straws could be provided if requested, and paper straws may be used if necessary.
  • Reusable cutlery and plates should be used. Single-use plastic spoons, forks, knives, and stirrers are prohibited. Non-recyclable mixed-material plates and containers should be avoided.
  • Dispensers for water and drinks should be made available instead of providing plastic bottles for water or drinks whenever possible. If plastic bottles are used, they should be recycled.
  • Recyclable materials should be taken back by the caterer or food vendor for recycling, or placed in the university’s recycling bins.
  • Leftover food shall be properly managed, such as by taking food home in reusable containers, feeding animals, or processing in composting, vermi-composting, or biodigestion facilities, with the help of the College of Agriculture.
  1. Waste Policies Related to Events and Festivals
    • The University shall strive to make events and festivals ultimately as models of Zero Waste.
    • Organizers and participants shall be required to adopt good practices and comply with increasingly stringent policies in subsequent years so as to meet Zero Waste targets.
    • Students, faculty, and staff shall be informed of waste prevention and management practices before events and festivals, including the Hibalag Festival.
    • Buildings & Grounds, the Student Government, or other responsible units shall ensure that sufficient bins for segregating leftover food and other biodegradable waste, recyclable materials, and residual waste are made available during events and festivals. The bins shall be clearly labelled and marked, and concessionaires, food vendors, booth operators, and event organizers shall be instructed on the locations and proper use of the bins.
    • Concessionaires, food vendors, booth operators, and event organizers shall segregate recyclable materials and show proof that prior arrangements had been made with junkshops or recyclers to take the recyclable materials. Alternatively, they can request Silliman University to take their recyclable materials at no cost.
    • Concessionaires, food vendors, booth operators, and event organizers shall segregate their leftover food and make arrangements to remove food waste once a day or more frequently to prevent smells and infestation. Furthermore, they have to show proof that the leftover food or food waste will be sent to local piggeries or composted. If these arrangements are made and implemented by Silliman University, the concessionaires, food vendors, booth operators, and event organizers shall be charged extra based on the number of sacks of food waste generated.
    • Concessionaires, food vendors, booth operators, and event organizers shall be asked to bring their residual wastes back or if they cannot do so, they shall be charged extra for waste disposal. Charges could be based on the number of sacks of residual waste generated.
    • Reusable or biodegradable bags with environmental messages shall be promoted and sold during events and festivals.
    • Expanded polystyrene (Styrofoam) cups, coolers, and containers as well as single-use plastic bags, plastic straws, plastic stirrers, and single-use plastic cutlery shall be
    • Environmental monitors shall be trained and deployed during the event or festival to ensure cleanliness and compliance of concessionaires, food vendors, booth operators, and event organizers with environmental agreements.
    • More stringent policies could be applied including:
      • Use of reusable or biodegradable plates and containers
      • Use of dispensers for drinking water and beverages, and minimization of water and beverages in plastic bottles
      • Use of percolators, pots, kettles, and reusable cups for hot drinks such as coffee and tea
      • Provision and use of facilities for washing, with proper wastewater collection and disposal, in order to eliminate disposable cutlery and plates as well as eliminate the need for plastic gloves for serving food
      • Prohibition of banners, posters, signs and bunting made of plastic material, especially polyvinyl chloride (PVC) used in tarpaulins or “tarps”
      • Prohibition of balloons made of rubber, plastic, or polyester film (Mylar)
      • Minimization of awards and prizes made of non-durable plastic material.
  1. Policies Related to Greening of the Campus
    • The University shall maintain and enhance the greening of the campus, including meeting and exceeding where practicable any tree planting quotas required by DENR, DepEd and other agencies.
    • The types of trees shall be carefully selected to promote native trees that are in harmony with the surrounding environment and that are appropriate for specific site conditions (e.g., type of soil, size constraint, root space restriction, sun exposure, etc.) and desired functions (e.g., shade, enhanced biodiversity, clean air, improved microclimate, runoff control, beautification, valuable derived products, etc.). Tree placement should be determined by a site evaluation according to the desired functions.
    • Tree planting shall be supervised by Buildings & Grounds in coordination with the Campus Beautification Committee and with the support of campus organizations.
    • Planting could be done within the school grounds, in other Silliman-owned properties such as CENTROP, as well as in public lands, parks, and other areas covered under RA 10176.
    • Tree planting activities should include provisions for long-term nurturing and maintenance to ensure survival of the trees. Examples of such provisions include working with or funding host organizations or local communities to provide water, mulching, and organic fertilizers as needed.

Definitions

Biodegradable materials: organic matter that can be readily broken down into carbon dioxide, water, methane or simple organic compounds by bacteria, fungi and other living things; examples include food waste, yard waste (such as leaves, twigs, grass cuttings, branches), coffee grounds, sawdust, cotton rags, etc.

Environmentally Preferable Products: products that have a less adverse impact on human health and the environment when compared with competing products. This comparison shall include a life-cycle assessment of products, including raw materials acquisition, production, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, reuse, operation, maintenance, recycling, waste management, and final disposal of the product

Environmentally Preferable Services: services that have a more beneficial or less adverse impact on human health and the environment when compared with competing services

Non-environmentally acceptable products or packaging: products or packaging that area unsafe in production, use, post-consumer use, or that produce or release harmful products (RA 9003)

Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substances (PBTs): groups of chemical compounds that are highly toxic, remain in the environment for long periods of time, are not readily destroyed, and build up or accumulate in body tissues; examples of PBTs are mercury, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dioxins and furans; pesticides such as Dieldrin and Chlordane, etc.

Recyclable materials: materials retrieved from the waste stream and free from contamination that can still be converted into suitable beneficial use or for other purpose; recyclables include, but are not limited to, tin cans, aluminum, PET plastic bottles (Recycling Symbol No. 1), newspaper, office paper, corrugated cardboard, ferrous scrap metal, non-ferrous scrap metal, glass, hard plastic bottles, and other materials accepted by local junkshops, recyclers, and recycling facilities

Segregation at source: separating, at the point of origin, different materials found in solid waste in order to promote recycling and re-use of resources and to reduce the volume of residual waste for collection and disposal

Source reduction: reduction of solid waste before it enters the solid waste stream by methods such as product design, materials substitution, materials re-use, and packaging restrictions (RA 9003)

Special wastes: hazardous wastes such as paints, thinners, batteries, lead-acid batteries, spray canisters, waste motor oil, as well as bulky material such as consumer electronics, white goods (e.g., refrigerators), and tires

 

SILLIMAN UNIVERSITY ENVIRONMENTAL Guidelines and Best Practices

  1. Buildings & Grounds
    • In order to implement segregation at source, all bins shall be designated for specific types of waste as follows:
      • All classroom, office, and library bins as well as bins inside dormitory rooms shall be for “PAPER ONLY”.
      • Hallway and outside bins shall be separately designated for “RECYCLABLES”, “BIODEGRADABLES” or “RESIDUAL WASTE” only. Groups of bins placed side by side for segregating recyclable, biodegradable, and residual waste shall be strategically located.
      • Toilet bins shall be designated for “RESIDUAL WASTE INCLUDING TISSUE PAPER” only (male toilets) or “RESIDUAL WASTE INCLUDING TISSUE PAPER AND SANITARY NAPKINS” only (female toilets).
      • Laboratory bins may be designated for “PAPER ONLY”, “RESIDUAL WASTE” or ‘SPECIAL/HAZARDOUS WASTE” as appropriate.
      • Each building or each academic unit (as the situation demands) shall have one bin for “SPECIAL/HAZARDOUS WASTE”.
      • An academic, administrative, or support unit may designate a bin to segregate a specific type of waste unique to the situation (such as a library that may wish to separate acetate sheets for internal reuse).
    • Each bin shall be labelled in English and Cebuano to indicate the specific type of waste for which the bin is designated. If space permits, pictorials may be used to illustrate examples of the types of waste that may be placed in the bin.
    • In the future, a uniform color-coding may be adopted. [A sample color coding is suggested by the recommendations in the draft DENR DAO on guidelines for mandatory solid waste segregation-at-source: Biodegradable – green, Recyclable – blue, Residual – black.] Alternatively, bins could also be transparent for easy identification of contents, with the label or some part of the bin painted with the recommended color code. Where necessary, bins could be lined with sacks or plastic bags that can be cleaned and used repeatedly. Color coding at the Marina Mission Clinic shall follow DOH guidelines: Infectious or Pathological– yellow, Biodegradable – green, Pharmaceutical wastes – yellow with black band, Recyclable or Residual can be black or colorless but recyclable bins should have the recycling symbol (Healthcare Waste Management Manual, DOH, 2015).
    • Janitors shall collect trash from inside buildings or offices at the end of the class period to avoid pest and rodent infestation.
    • Collection of waste shall be done using a waste truck and segregation shall be maintained during collection and transport.
    • Waste shall be transported to a Materials Recovery Facility (MRF). The MRF shall include a secondary sorting area to ensure proper segregation. Periodic measurements of the degree of segregation shall be made and recorded to ensure target levels of compliance are achieved. An appropriate number of people shall be assigned to the MRF.
    • The MRF shall include segregated storage areas for recyclables, biodegradable materials, special wastes, and residual wastes. Recyclable materials shall be stored until they are transported to junkshops, recyclers, or recycling facilities. Biodegradable (compostable) waste will be processed in composting, vermi-composting and/or biodigestion facilities, with the help of the College of Agriculture; some biodegradable waste, such as wood, may be donated. Residual waste shall be compacted at the MRF in the in-house compactor and taken to the City’s dumpsite or landfill. Measurements of the weights and volumes of recyclable, biodegradable, residual, and special wastes shall be made and recorded; measurements shall be shared with the Administration for the purpose of evaluating performance and working towards Zero Waste targets, and for reports submitted to DENR-EMB Region 7.
    • Leftover foods not brought home shall be fed to animals (e.g., given to piggeries or animal shelters), except for spoiled foods which shall be processed in composting, vermi-composting and/or biodigestion facilities.
    • Special / hazardous wastes (such as asbestos corrugated roof sheets, waste oils, fluorescent lamps, and batteries) shall be stored safety at or near the MRF until they are removed by an accredited hazardous waste transporter/treater approved by DENR/EMB.
    • Waste electrical & electronic equipment and broken mechanical equipment shall be segregated in a designated building or new warehouse to determine which can be repaired, dismantled for parts, or disposed of properly.
    • Glass bottles and ceramics which cannot be reused or recycled shall be ground in a grinder/shredder and added to sand for concrete construction.
    • Buildings & Grounds shall ensure that water fountains are in working order and properly maintained.
  1. Academic Departments
    • All academic departments shall incorporate environmental protection including waste management in their curricula or as subject matter for teaching and discussion.
    • Faculty and staff meetings in all departments shall include discussion of waste prevention and waste management policies on campus and implement the policies in their areas of responsibility.
      • Departments shall work with Buildings & Grounds to ensure a sufficient number and ideal placement of bins, proper labelling and pictographs on bins, and timely collection.
      • Departments shall educate all faculty, staff, and students on strict segregation and proper management of biodegradable, recyclable, special, and residual wastes.
      • Departments shall monitor and ensure compliance with segregation and management policies.
    • Purchasing of products and procurement of services shall follow Green Procurement Policies in Section 2.
    • Departments should practice double-sided printing or copying to minimize paper consumption as much as possible. Papers that contains sensitive information should be shredded. Departments shall contact Buildings & Grounds for pick-up of shredded paper.
    • Students, faculty, staff, and their guests who bring packed lunches and eat inside offices shall be responsible for their food waste. Leftover foods should be brought home. Throwing leftover foods in trash bins not for biodegradable waste is strictly prohibited.
    • Students, faculty, and staff shall be encouraged to bring their own reusable mugs, cups, bags, and drinking water bottles.
    • Departments shall work with Food Services and any outside food vendors and caterers to ensure that the Food and Food Waste policies in Section 3 are observed whenever food is provided for meetings, seminars, conferences, and other events.
    • Departments shall ensure that kiosk operators and food vendors under their supervision comply with the Food and Food Waste policies in Section 3.
    • Departments shall contact Buildings & Grounds for the pick-up of reusable or repairable assets, such as old printers, keyboards, chairs, etc.
  1. Administrative and Support Service Units
    • All administrative and support service units shall include discussion of waste prevention and management policies on campus and implement those policies in their areas of responsibility.
      • Units shall work with Buildings & Grounds to ensure a sufficient number and ideal placement of bins, proper labelling and pictographs on bins, and timely collection.
      • Units shall educate all personnel on strict segregation and proper management of biodegradable, recyclable, special, and residual wastes.
      • Units shall monitor and ensure compliance with segregation and management policies.
    • Purchasing of products and procurement of services shall follow Green Procurement Policies in Section 2.
    • Administrative and support service personnel who bring packed lunches and eat inside offices shall be responsible for their food waste. Leftover foods should be brought home. Throwing leftover foods in trash bins not for biodegradable waste is strictly prohibited.
    • Administrative and support service personnel shall be encouraged to bring their own reusable mugs, cups, bags, and drinking water bottles.
    • Administrative and support service personnel shall work with Food Services and any outside food vendors and caterers to ensure that the Food and Food Waste policies in Section 3 are observed whenever food is provided for meetings, seminars, conferences, and other events.
    • Administrative and support service personnel shall ensure that kiosk operators and food vendors under their supervision comply with the Food and Food Waste policies in Section 3.
  1. Student Affairs
    • General policies regarding waste prevention and management shall be incorporated in rules and regulations regarding the conduct of students and included in the Student Manual.
    • Waste management guidelines shall be presented to students during meetings, assemblies, or convocations. A reminder of the basic guidelines regarding waste segregation and no littering should be mentioned at the start of on-campus events including theater, music, and athletics.
    • Students shall be encouraged to purchase or share costs of buying products (such as soap, shampoo, food condiments, etc.) in large containers to eliminate sachets and minimize waste.
    • Students shall be requested to cooperate and support the Cafeteria, Buildings & Grounds, their dorms, academic departments, and other units of the university in implementing waste prevention and management policies.
    • Environmental preservation, sustainability, and natural resource conservation shall be promoted where possible in personal enhancement programs and seminars/workshops on leadership and human development.
  1. Student Government
    • The Student Government shall work with Buildings & Grounds and other units to affix pictographs on bins and to display informational posters in order to facilitate segregation.
    • The Student Government shall conduct information, education and communication (IEC) campaigns to promote waste prevention and proper management.
      • The Student Government shall work with student organizations to ensure awareness of and compliance with the university’s general policies on waste prevention and management.
      • The Student Government in collaboration with selected departments will launch a contest on environmental messaging and environmental artwork, and a design contest for trash bins.
      • The Student Government shall promote Zero Waste through posters, sale of reusable bags, artwork, music, street theater, and other cultural forms.
    • The Student Government, in cooperation with faculty and staff, shall organize teams to monitor compliance with waste prevention and management policies, and to conduct educational campaigns in areas of poor compliance.
    • The Student Government shall work with the Administration to document compliance for the purpose of evaluating performance and working towards Zero Waste targets.
    • The Student Government shall work with food vendors, concessionaires, and booth operators to gradually adopt the Waste Policies Related to Events and Festivals in Section 4 and work towards making the Hibalag Festival a Zero Waste event.
  1. Student Housing and Residences
    • Student Housing and Residences shall ensure that general policies on waste prevention and management are followed in dorms and other student residences.
    • Meetings of dormitory management and officers shall include discussion of waste prevention and management policies on campus and implement those policies in their areas of responsibility.
      • Student Housing and Residences shall work with Buildings & Grounds to ensure a sufficient number and ideal placement of bins, proper labelling and pictographs on bins, and timely collection.
      • Student Housing and Residences shall educate all residents on strict segregation and proper management of biodegradable, recyclable, special, and residual wastes.
      • Dormitory officers shall monitor and ensure compliance with segregation and management policies, as well as policies regarding food and food waste.
    • Student Housing and Residences shall encourage residents to purchase or share costs of buying products (such as soap, shampoo, food condiments, etc.) in large containers to eliminate sachets and minimize waste. Residents will be encouraged to use reusable cloth bags, such as those available from the Food Services Department, for shopping and laundry.
  1. Food Services
    • The Food Services Department shall practice proper food storage and stock inventory including:
      • Making sure freezers and refrigerators are working at the right temperatures and food storage areas are clean and tidy
      • Using the First In, First Out (FIFO) rule when storing food and stocks and displaying food for sale
      • Keeping detailed lists of food in all storage areas and the “use-by/best-before” dates to prevent foods from going to waste
      • Conducting an inventory frequently to compare purchase and quantity of waste.
    • The Food Services Department shall practice proper food preparation and portion control, including
      • Using exact amounts of ingredients in preparing food
      • Segregating kitchen waste properly
      • Being cautious in serving portions of food without affecting quality
      • Identifying leftovers that can be stored and recycled
      • Offering discount prices to dishes which cannot be recycled the following day.
    • The Food Services Department shall eliminate plastics and practice recycling, specifically
      • Eliminating plastic cups and straws
      • Minimizing or eliminating the use and purchase of food products in plastic packaging
      • Reusing or recycling plastic bottles, cans, cardboard boxes, wooden pallets, and paper material
      • Recycling food waste and using composted waste as organic fertilizer.
    • The Food Services Department shall follow the following purchasing guidelines:
      • Reducing packaging by procuring in bulk rather than in small, ready-to-use sachets
      • Reducing purchases of products with excessive packaging, and avoiding Styrofoam packaging all together
      • Using juice and water dispensers instead of plastic bottles for refreshments.
    • The Food Services Department shall follow the following general guidelines:
      • Purchase only the amount of material needed to save money at the same time lessen the need to discard unused materials
      • Reuse all possible items including looking into the possibility of selling items which cannot be reused.
      • Recycle all possible items including processing and transforming wastes into new marketable products.
    • The Food Services Department shall promote and sell reusable bags and aprons made from food sacks.
    • The Food Services Department shall adopt other practices as outlined in the Policies on Food and Food Waste in Section 3 above.
    • The Food Services Department shall promote more awareness through consumer education and conduct employee training on proper waste management practices.
  1. College of Agriculture
    • The College shall assist Food Services and Buildings & Grounds in the management of biodegradable waste.
    • Biodegradable waste shall be processed using composting, vermi-composting, or biodigestion to generate organic compost, vermicast, or natural gas. Compost and vermicast can be used by the College, by other units, or sold as fertilizer. Biogas can be used by the College, by other units, or sold as cooking gas or gas for heating.
    • Teaching and demonstrating advanced biodegradation methods and designs shall be encouraged in collaboration with other departments.
  1. Elementary and High School Departments
    • In addition to “No Littering”, messages on waste reduction and segregation shall be emphasized.
    • The topics of environmental protection including waste management shall be incorporated in the curricula or as subject matter for teaching and discussion.
    • Teachers and staff shall include discussion of waste prevention and management policies on campus and implement those policies in their areas of responsibility.
      • The Elementary and High School Departments shall work with Buildings & Grounds to ensure a sufficient number and ideal placement of bins, proper labelling and pictographs on bins, and timely collection.
      • The Elementary and High School Departments shall educate all teachers, staff, and students on strict segregation and proper management of biodegradable, recyclable, special, and residual wastes.
      • The Elementary and High School Departments shall work with parents on adopting the policies related to food and food waste.
      • The Elementary and High School Departments shall monitor and ensure compliance with segregation and management policies.
    • Purchasing of products and procurement of services shall follow Green Procurement Policies in Section 2.
    • Students, teachers, and staff shall be encouraged to bring their own reusable mugs, cups, bags, and drinking water bottles.
  1. Information and dissemination
    • The Office of Information and Publications shall promote environmental protection, the conservation and enhancement of our natural resources, and sustainability through relevant articles and reflections.
    • Information regarding Silliman University’s environmental policies, guidelines, best practices, as well as Zero Waste targets and other environmental goals shall be disseminated to the Silliman community.
    • Environmental achievements, success stories, challenges, case studies, and the results of periodic evaluations of Silliman University’s environmental performance shall be publicized through press releases, publications, social media, the Internet, print and broadcast media, and other channels for information dissemination.

 

EXAMPLES OF THE TYPES OF WASTE

Paper only: clean paper, scratch paper, notebook paper, printer paper, newspaper, handouts, magazines, paper ads, etc.; not including tissue

Recyclables: translucent plastic bottles for water or juice, aluminum cans (soft drink cans), tin cans, steel cans, glass bottles, opaque plastic bottles, clean paper, clean carton or cardboard, etc.

Biodegradables: food waste, fruit peels, rice, vegetables, leftover food, fish bones, barbecue sticks, leaves, twigs, grass cuttings, old flowers, pencil shavings, paper wrappers from snacks, pizza boxes, paper soiled with food waste and/or drinks—everything that naturally degrades; not including plastic

Residual waste: sachets, plastic wrappers, thin plastic bags, plastic snack bags, tetrapaks and other mixed-material containers (e.g., inseparable paper-plastic, paper-aluminum, etc.), any Styrofoam waste, plastic straws, plastic spoons/forks, single-use plastic cups, etc.

Special/hazardous waste: batteries, light bulbs, fluorescent tubes, spray cans, paints, chemicals (e.g., solvents, thinners), needles, syringes, thermometers, blood-contaminated materials, etc.

 

Working Document 1
October 2018